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mother of all U.V. ART thread

allillusory


Started Topics :  1
Posts :  35
Posted : Aug 10, 2008 00:46:26
Hello.

I have read up until page 24 of this forum...
And I can't seem to find a complete definitive _how to_ thread for beginners who want to create u.v. art for backdrops, clothing, etc...

Specifically, I want to start with creating backdrops that I can hang around my room.
All I know so far is that I need to buy wildfire paint?
If I buy this paint will it come with easy instructions, and that is all?

I have used oil paints on canvas before, so that is my previous artist background.

I thought maybe it would be helpful for other beginners as well to have this "mother of all..." thread just like they do in the music production forums.

thanks!
daya


Started Topics :  8
Posts :  307
Posted : Aug 10, 2008 11:43
White canvas always produce the riches result of the UV reflexion, no need Gesso. Use the ready-mix airbrush paints from Pearl Paint or other art supply shop as a main paint (for somehow i personally think this mix is good enough for using regular brushes (not too thick and not to but slightly thin which I like, other reason is effectiveness and efficiency, time babe!!!). Use the Wildfire-kind only for high-light spots to give the 3D-ish FX (because they are brighter but, using Wildfire too much in large area, could cause cracks when you roll or fold your backdrop during transportation or storing.

PLEASE do not us tempera paint (I know they are cheap and produce the same active uv, but they will washed-away by the rain, or other wet causes such drunken K-heads (he..he.., joking), unless mixing it with medium, but medium price alone is more expensive than ready-mixed uv paints. If use the finish solution, they have to be absorbed through the tempera spores and hole canvas fiber (Too much effort).

Important!!!
Work in 3 different lighting set-up.

1.dark space with only full black-light

2. natural daytime light or other regular lighting (without black-light)

3rd is, with a full black-light and a little of natural light/regular lighting

Switch these setting frequently & back up to the comfy chair in the front of the artwork so you can scrutinize the work with free flow inspiration, idea and imagination.

with music or without, with smoke or without, with coffee or without, just don't forget to get up from that chair and paint again hehe but it cannot be without PATIENCE...

When you work have your eyes away from too much direct contact with UV lights, best is if the UV lights located behind you. Get out from your dark room/basement/cave/attic to see the FAR OBJECT/VIEW or some green nature if you still love those eyes.


have a nice trip!!!
          founder http://www.enkienterprise.com
founder http://www.blacksheephybrid
~Cortex~
IsraTrance Junior Member

Started Topics :  29
Posts :  237
Posted : Aug 11, 2008 12:06
Daya Quote: "with music or without, with smoke or without, with coffee or without, just don't forget to get up from that chair and paint again hehe but it cannot be without PATIENCE... "

I agree... hehehe days doing that... lost in illusions. Personally I paint in day light and only check at night... when you figure your paint.. you know what happens next           U.V Art & Design
www.divinemusictribe.com /www.echo-vortex.com
myspace.com/cortexuvarts/PsYcRoWdElIcA Festival
Supporting: EchoVortex Rec, Parvati Rec, Hypnotica REC
Pyite
IsraTrance Junior Member

Started Topics :  25
Posts :  238
Posted : Aug 13, 2008 18:27
I like to use gesso to prime my canvas. That way when I fuck up I can just plop some gesso over the spot that doesn't look right and can repaint it. If the canvas isn't primed and I make a mistake, when I repaint the mistake spot it doesn't glow as brightly as the rest of the drop.

You definitely don't need to only use wildfire. It's really expensive, and some colors (blue, red, green) glow just as brightly with cheap fluorescent paint. I use wildfire for purple mainly. I've also had some good luck buying fluorescent airbrush paint and just using it with a brush-- you can find some new colors by experimenting.

As far as painting in blacklight or daylight, I try to do both, because sometimes the drop will look great in blacklight.... and really really weird in regular light. The trick is to make it look great in both...

Have fun!!!!
          Punch You In The Eye

http://www.atlantapsytrance.net
augenstern


Started Topics :  4
Posts :  40
Posted : Aug 15, 2008 14:17
Hi everybody,

it's really interesting to see how others work with uv paint...
As i have absolutely no experience with airbrushing, it did never come to my mind to use airbrush-colours, even with a brush.
Compared to acrylic colours, aren't they very expensive, especially when doing large backdrops ? Maybe I'll have to try that out.
I'm happy using acrylic-paint and brushes.
Another thing is using cotton or canvas...
I started out using it, but then came the point when I was asked to have the pictures fire-resistant when hanging them in clubs. I know that you can spray backdrops with some anti-fire-thing, but that is firstly really expensive and secondly aggressively poisonous to your own and mother nature's health. So I started to paint on synthetic, already anti-fire-treated (inside the fibres) cloth.
I prefer to prime dark cloth with white gesso and then paint several layers of colour on it. Although I know that this procedure takes a lot of time, i like the aspect of layering differently transparent shades of colour. Acrylic uv-paint has to be layered anyway.
The disadvantage of this procedure is that in the end the paint is very thick on the cloth and might break when folding the picture. So I always roll them for transport or storage. in the black light you do not see cracks in the paint anyway.
I paint under black light as well as under normal light. I think especially for outdoor parties, it's important that the pic looks good under both. Mostly there is a little more deepness in the black light, because contrasts come out much more.

So try out what is best for you! Cheers.

PS: Have a look at my psygarden_gallery:
http://www.psygarden.be/gallery/v/Backdrops/Augenstern/
daya


Started Topics :  8
Posts :  307
Posted : Aug 17, 2008 03:40
Quote:

On 2008-08-15 14:17, augenstern wrote:
Hi everybody,

...to use airbrush-colours, even with a brush.
Compared to acrylic colours, aren't they very expensive...

So I started to paint on synthetic, already anti-fire-treated (inside the fibres) cloth.

I..prefer to prime dark cloth with white gesso

So I always roll them for transport or storage. in the black light you do not see cracks in the paint anyway.

PS: Have a look at my psygarden_gallery:
http://www.psygarden.be/gallery/v/Backdrops/Augenstern/



not sure which ones is more expensive between airbrush-colours and regular acrylic paints. my experience is the airbrush-colours is more flexible with fabric and more absorbs when brushing it in a large strokes such doing sky etc, but regular acrylic paints slightly have a stronger value in opacity tho but not sure about its flexibility and absorb. So you might consider this to your judgement to avoid a break/crack

When you say you started to paint on synthetic, already anti-fire-treated (inside the fibres) cloth, do you mean you bought the material that is already ttreated or you treat it your self). Also be careful of some synthetic fabric such low count mesh polyester because if you use a white gesso base, they usually stretch the canvas in the area when you lay the gesso...

I myself sometime love work on the black canvas with gesso base but it does required to have many many layers to get the strong UV reaction and opacity. But when you get to the point of that time consuming, you'll get satisfactory.

However white base canvas still the winner of the color vibrant, like the my old piece called asia 5x10ft at http://www.psygarden.be/gallery/v/Backdrops/blacksheephybrid/backdrops/?g2_page=2 but if you want a black color background on that white canvas for a detail work, you also also will spend an intensive time and labor and when make a mistake, it's pain to fix those transparance layers           founder http://www.enkienterprise.com
founder http://www.blacksheephybrid
augenstern


Started Topics :  4
Posts :  40
Posted : Aug 17, 2008 12:35
Quote:

When you say you started to paint on synthetic, already anti-fire-treated (inside the fibres) cloth, do you mean you bought the material that is already ttreated or you treat it your self). Also be careful of some synthetic fabric such low count mesh polyester because if you use a white gesso base, they usually stretch the canvas in the area when you lay the gesso...



It's the material of the fabric itself that complies to national anti-fire guidelines, so there's no need to treat it again. It simply means that if you hold a flame to it, it won't continue to burn when you remove the flame. It's called Trevira CS.
Although that material doesn't feel very "natural" and is slightly heavier than cotton or canvas, I became used to working with it - maybe because I found someone who supplies it to me much cheaper than the regular price. As I often hang my backdrops in clubs where the owners aren't used to decoration at all, it's alway a good point to have a security-paper that shows that it's no risk for them.
It's sad that your work sometimes is more considered as a risk than as a piece of art.

Priming with white gesso is absolutely neccesary, firstly because of the intensity of the uv-effect, secondly because acrylic paint simply won't stick properly on that material. On the other hand my motives aren't all-over motives, so priming the neccesary areas is ok in amounts of time. I usually do two or three layers of white gesso before going on with acrylic uv-colours.
Surprisingly the gesso doesn't stretch the fabric when putting it on, it oppositely un-stretches it (please excuse my bad english) as long as the gesso isn't dry. But as I normally put the fabric into a frame before painting where it is very lightly stretched, that effect vanishes when the gesso dries.

I actually feel the need to try out some new techniques and materials.........

What a shame that I didn't discover this forum years ago. I would have been very thankful for some useful hints. Now my time to do paintings is very limited. But still enjoying this technical exchange very much !
mez
IsraTrance Junior Member

Started Topics :  13
Posts :  163
Posted : Oct 22, 2008 21:21
so where do you buy the stuff?
augenstern


Started Topics :  4
Posts :  40
Posted : Oct 25, 2008 22:27
Quote:

On 2008-10-22 21:21, mez wrote:
so where do you buy the stuff?




You mean the trevira-cs fabric......?
i get it from a man who used to work in the factory where it is produced. he is retired now, but uses his connection to his former working place to support various art-projects of any kind. i had the pleasure to be introduced to him .
but you can surely check the web for that or similar kinds of fabric.....
if you need to have your backdrops anti-flammable (???) you can also spray them with some chemical....good luck
allillusory


Started Topics :  1
Posts :  35
Posted : Nov 6, 2008 20:32
thanks for the tips guys. I never really got started as I am too busy. Whatever spare time i have, I channel towards making music.

But now I want to make u.v. t-shirts...
I was thinking to make stencils and spray paint fluorescent aerosol... Would any fluorescent aerosol work for this?
And if i wanted to paint by hand which paint would i use? same as the backdrop paint?
thanks again...
Pyite
IsraTrance Junior Member

Started Topics :  25
Posts :  238
Posted : Nov 7, 2008 21:05
You can buy fluorescent screen printing ink...

might be easier than using spraypaint :-P           Punch You In The Eye

http://www.atlantapsytrance.net
allillusory


Started Topics :  1
Posts :  35
Posted : Nov 8, 2008 04:55
Quote:

On 2008-11-07 21:05, Pyite wrote:
You can buy fluorescent screen printing ink...

might be easier than using spraypaint :-P




yes, you are right... I might as well screen print it. Well at least that I know how to do... I just need to get access to an exposure unit...

but maybe spraypaint could work on canvas shoes? just tape up some symmetrical patterns it could look killer...
daya


Started Topics :  8
Posts :  307
Posted : Nov 8, 2008 14:16
Quote:

On 2008-11-08 04:55, allillusory wrote:
Quote:

On 2008-11-07 21:05, Pyite wrote:
You can buy fluorescent screen printing ink...

might be easier than using spraypaint :-P




yes, you are right... I might as well screen print it. Well at least that I know how to do... I just need to get access to an exposure unit...

but maybe spraypaint could work on canvas shoes? just tape up some symmetrical patterns it could look killer...



yeah, finding a large format (i mean very large) exposure unit and screen stretcher aso apart of my dilema           founder http://www.enkienterprise.com
founder http://www.blacksheephybrid
allillusory


Started Topics :  1
Posts :  35
Posted : Nov 8, 2008 22:30
Quote:

On 2008-11-08 14:16, daya wrote:

yeah, finding a large format (i mean very large) exposure unit and screen stretcher aso apart of my dilema




i dont know what your area is like, daya... but maybe you could look into artist communities. Here in the san francisco area there are community exposure units, so i am kinda lucky. and surely you could just buy framed screens at an art store?
Dreamkeeper


Started Topics :  6
Posts :  249
Posted : Oct 16, 2011 09:45
help!
i got a rayon cloth for uv painting. do i need to apply gesso before painitng.can some1 show me an example of paintings with gesso n without.how does it effect the painiting.
Trance Forum  Forum  Trance Art - mother of all U.V. ART thread

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